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The artwork of concealing or misrepresenting one’s identification within the bodily world has lengthy been practiced by spies engaged in espionage. In response, intelligence businesses designed strategies and applied sciences to determine folks making an attempt to cover behind aliases.

Now, following the U.S. Supreme Court docket ruling overturning Roe v Wade, girls in america in search of help with undesirable pregnancies have joined the ranks of spies.

The ruling has resulted in a number of set off legal guidelines coming into impact in conservative states to outlaw abortions in these states. These legal guidelines, coupled with teams focusing on girls’s reproductive rights protests, have raised worry amongst girls of all ages about their knowledge getting used in opposition to them.

Hundreds have engaged with on-line posts calling on girls to delete their period tracking apps, on the premise that knowledge fed to those apps may very well be used to prosecute them in states the place abortion is prohibited. On the identical time, abortion clinics in New Mexico (the place abortion stays authorized) are reportedly bracing for an inflow of girls from U.S. states.

As somebody who has served as a particular agent for america Military and Federal Bureau of Investigation, and as a Senior Intelligence Officer with the U.S. Protection Intelligence Company, I can let you know deleting interval monitoring apps is probably not sufficient for susceptible girls now.

However there are some instruments girls can use to hide their identities, ought to this be needed—the identical instruments as soon as reserved for skilled spies.

The privateness fantasy

Other than espionage, the emergence of the web created a brand new impetus for widespread knowledge assortment by knowledge aggregators and entrepreneurs. The fashionable surveillance economic system grew out of a need to focus on services and products to us as successfully as attainable.

Immediately, huge swathes of private info are extracted from customers, 24/7—making it more and more troublesome to stay unmasked.

Knowledge aggregation is used to evaluate our buying habits, observe our actions, discover our favourite areas and procure detailed demographic details about us, our households, our co-workers and buddies.

Current occasions have demonstrated how tenuous our privateness is. Protests in Hong Kong have seen Chinese language authorities use cameras to determine and arrest protesters, whereas police within the U.S. deployed numerous applied sciences to determine Black Lives Matter protesters.

Articles appeared in Australian media outlets with recommendation on how one can keep away from being surveilled. And folks have been directed to web sites, such because the Electronic Frontier Foundation, devoted to informing readers about how one can keep away from surveillance and private knowledge assortment.

What we have discovered from each spy historical past and newer occasions is that knowledge assortment isn’t all the time overt and apparent; it is typically unseen and opaque. Surveillance could come within the type of cameras, drones, automated quantity plate readers (ANPR/ALPR), toll payment devices, acoustic collectors and naturally any internet-connected machine.

In some instances when your fellow protesters add pictures or movies, crowd-sourced intelligence turns into your enemy.

Knowledge deleted, not destroyed

Lately, lots of the main target has been on telephones and apps. However deleting is not going to stop the identification of a person, nor will turning off location providers.

Regulation enforcement and even business corporations have the power to entry or observe sure metrics together with:

  • worldwide cellular subscriber identification (IMSI), which is expounded to a consumer’s cellular quantity and related to their SIM card
  • worldwide cellular tools identification (IMEI), which is straight associated to their machine itself.

Advert servers may exploit machine areas. Non-public corporations can create commercials focusing on gadgets which are particular to a location, reminiscent of a girls’s well being clinic. And such “geofenced” advert servers can determine a consumer’s location no matter whether or not their location settings are disabled.

Additional, anonymised telephone observe knowledge (like name indicators pinging off close by towers) could be bought from telecommunications suppliers and de-anonymised.

Regulation enforcement can use this knowledge to hint paths from, say, a fertility clinic to an individual’s dwelling or “mattress down” location (the spy time period for somebody’s residence).

The underside line is your telephone is a marker for you. A brief cellular phone with an abroad SIM card has been the selection for some folks wishing to keep away from such monitoring.

Including to that, we not too long ago noticed headlines about facial recognition expertise being utilized in Australian retail shops—and America isn’t any totally different. For anybody making an attempt to evade detection, it is higher to swap financial institution playing cards for money, stored-value playing cards or present playing cards when making purchases.

And utilizing public transport paid with money or a ride-share service offers higher anonymity than utilizing a private automobile, or perhaps a rental.

Within the spy world, listening to one’s gown is crucial. Spies change up their look, utilizing what they name “polish,” with the assistance of reversible clothes, hats, totally different types of glasses, scarves and even masks (that are ideally not conspicuous lately). In excessive instances, they might even use “home equipment” to alter their facial characteristics.

Then once more, whereas these measures assist in the bodily world, they do little to cease on-line detection.

Digital stealth

On-line, the usage of a digital non-public community (VPN) and/or the onion browser, Tor, will assist enhance anonymity, together with from web service suppliers.

On-line you’ll be able to create and use a number of personas, every with a unique e mail deal with and “private knowledge” linked to it. Aliases could be additional coupled with software program that removes cookies and browser historical past, which can assist conceal one’s on-line identification.

One instance is CCleaner. This program removes privacy-violating cookies and web historical past out of your machine, whereas bettering your machine’s privateness.

There are additionally loads of on-line purposes that enable the usage of short-term e mail addresses and telephone numbers, and even short-term lodging addresses for package deal deliveries.

To some, these could look like excessive privateness measures. Nevertheless, given the widespread assortment of identification knowledge by business corporations and governments—and the resultant collaboration between the 2—there’s purpose to be involved for anybody eager to fly below the radar.

And for girls in search of abortions within the U.S., these measures could also be essential to keep away from prosecution.


Post Roe, women in America are right to be concerned about digital surveillance. And it’s not just period-tracking apps


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This text is republished from The Conversation below a Inventive Commons license. Learn the original article.The Conversation

Quotation:
After Roe v Wade, this is how girls might undertake ‘spycraft’ to keep away from monitoring and prosecution (2022, June 30)
retrieved 30 June 2022
from https://techxplore.com/information/2022-06-roe-wade-women-spycraft-tracking.html

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Research reveals how common online health marketing practices may violate patient privacy

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Research reveals how common online health marketing practices may violate patient privacy

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The Well being Insurance coverage Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was handed in 1996 to guard delicate protected well being info (PHI) from being disclosed with out affected person consent. However a examine revealed August 15 within the journal Patterns reveals that some PHI will not be as safe as anticipated. Researchers reviewed the techniques of 5 digital medication corporations and the actions of cross-site monitoring software program to reveal how searching knowledge associated to well being subjects is shared with Fb for lead era and promoting functions.

“We began doing this analysis as a result of we need to make sure that individuals perceive how they’re focused and adopted throughout totally different digital platforms, together with on-line well being companies and social media apps like Fb,” says co-author Andrea Downing, an impartial safety researcher and co-founder of the Mild Collective, a gaggle created to check cybersecurity dangers within the realm of affected person privateness. “For my part, knowledge gathering and predictive algorithms which are used for promoting and different functions are one of many largest threats to on-line affected person communities.”

To conduct the evaluation, the investigators recruited ten affected person advocates and requested them to share knowledge on how a few of their on-line actions had been being tracked. The investigators targeted on affected person advocates working within the hereditary most cancers group house, significantly moderators of Fb-based assist teams. The individuals had been requested to obtain and share their JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) recordsdata. These recordsdata reveal how knowledge are shared between internet servers and internet apps. The investigators used these recordsdata to find out how info flows from health-related web sites and apps to Fb for the needs of focused promoting.

The investigators targeted on 5 medical companies utilized by the individuals. They reviewed the businesses’ web sites for third-party advert trackers and checked out whether or not use of those advert trackers complied with the businesses’ personal privateness insurance policies. Additionally they checked out Fb’s advert library for every participant to find out whether or not well being knowledge obtained by these corporations influenced the kinds of advertisements that the individuals had been seeing.

“We continually get bombarded by these advertisements,” Downing says. “Our query is, why they’re being served as much as us, and what info do these third events have with a view to serve up these advertisements?”

The 5 corporations included within the evaluation present info or companies (together with ) associated to inherited most cancers danger. The investigators decided that two of the businesses focused advertisements however had been according to their very own privateness insurance policies. The opposite three didn’t adjust to their very own insurance policies and claims of privateness. “This lack of privateness may cause hurt within the flawed fingers, from individuals who need to rip-off the affected person group or goal them with misinformation,” Downing says.

That is the primary peer-reviewed examine from the Mild Collective, which was based in 2019 to check points round affected person privateness and digital media. Earlier this summer season, the Mild Collective introduced their analysis to the Markup, a nonprofit information group targeted on the intersection of know-how and society. The Markup revealed a associated examine about how hospitals share delicate medical info collected on their web sites with advertisers.

“We acknowledge that this can be a small sampling that solely scratched the floor, and clearly way more analysis is required right here,” Downing says. “We need to put this examine within the fingers of information scientists and to accomplice with researchers who can broaden upon it. There may be clearly a much-needed dialogue on this nation in regards to the state of and the way it impacts all affected person populations.”


9 in 10 Americans want their health info kept private


Extra info:
Andrea Downing, Well being Promoting on Fb: Privateness & Coverage Concerns, Patterns (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.patter.2022.100561. www.cell.com/patterns/fulltext … 2666-3899(22)00172-6

Quotation:
Analysis reveals how frequent on-line well being advertising practices might violate affected person privateness (2022, August 15)
retrieved 15 August 2022
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Amazon, Oracle shrug off lawmaker fears of abortion data sales

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Amazon, Oracle shrug off lawmaker fears of abortion data sales

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Amazon.com Inc., Oracle Corp. and different information suppliers pressed by a bunch of U.S. lawmakers about how they promote cell phone location information supplied assurances that the data could not be used to trace people looking for abortion providers.

U.S. Consultant Lori Trahan, one of many Home members questioning the businesses, stated she wasn’t happy with the solutions.

Whereas all the businesses detailed methods they hold information anonymized, “related practices and insurance policies at various brokers have already confirmed inadequate, even earlier than the overturning of Roe raised the stakes for tens of hundreds of thousands of girls,” Trahan stated Friday in an announcement to Bloomberg.

Trahan was amongst six Democratic Home members and together with Entry Now, Battle for the Future and Amnesty Worldwide that requested data in July on information safety insurance policies from Amazon, Oracle, MobileWalla and Close to Intelligence Holdings Inc. The questions adopted the Supreme Court docket’s determination overturning a federal proper to abortion, which has sparked considerations that could possibly be utilized by legislation enforcement in states which have outlawed or restricted abortion to prosecute individuals who search reproductive care.

The responses to the lawmakers and have not been beforehand reported, and provides perception into how corporations are navigating heightened scrutiny on information practices as abortion turns into more and more criminalized within the U.S.

Oracle’s information platform does not “allow clients to create datasets which can be thought of delicate,” similar to these referring to being pregnant or abortions or “perform as a standalone market for uncooked feeds of people’ location information,” Oracle Government Vice President Ken Glueck wrote in a letter to members of Congress.

Amazon stated that any information bought on its platform is anonymized, and that it’ll adhere to relevant state and native legal guidelines. A spokesperson for Trahan’s workplace stated complying with native legal guidelines on this context may imply handing over digital proof of an abortion below a courtroom order.

Amazon and Oracle promote information merchandise from third-party corporations on their cloud marketplaces, together with bulk location data harvested from cell phones. Lawmakers have lengthy sounded the alarm on the sensitivity of those information streams and requires regulation have accelerated within the wake of the courtroom’s determination.

Privateness regulation has develop into a spotlight in Washington—a bipartisan legislative package deal gained traction in current months—however lawmakers stay divided on enforcement and different key points. The Federal Commerce Fee below Chair Lina Khan introduced Thursday that it’s exploring new guidelines to guard the non-public information that companies acquire about shoppers.

MobileWalla, a privately owned agency that collects and sells information from cell phones, informed the lawmakers it does not promote data to legislation enforcement entities or let clients present or use information for legislation enforcement functions. Final 12 months, the Wall Avenue Journal reported that the corporate had bought client data from cell phones that ended up with federal businesses and army contractors. MobileWalla additionally come below fireplace for monitoring the actions and demographics of crowds throughout Black Lives Matter protests in 2020.

Close to Intelligence, one other information dealer, informed the lawmakers it does not permit the usage of information by , the army, or for well being care functions. The lawmakers declined to offer the letters from the businesses about their enterprise practices.


Google to delete user location history on US abortion clinic visits


2022 Bloomberg L.P.
Distributed by Tribune Content material Company, LLC.

Quotation:
Amazon, Oracle shrug off lawmaker fears of abortion information gross sales (2022, August 12)
retrieved 12 August 2022
from https://techxplore.com/information/2022-08-amazon-oracle-lawmaker-abortion-sales.html

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Ex-Qualcomm research vice president and three others charged in $150 million fraud scheme

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Federal prosecutors unveiled fraud and money-laundering expenses this week towards a former Qualcomm analysis engineer and three others for allegedly duping the San Diego firm into paying $150 million to accumulate know-how that it putatively owned already.

A handed up the indictment in Might, but it surely was unsealed on Monday. It alleges the quartet—together with two San Diego residents—choreographed a scheme to defraud Qualcomm after ex-Vice President of Analysis and Improvement Karim Arabi got here up with a sooner methodology for evaluating micro-processors through the “design for take a look at” course of whereas working on the firm.

Below phrases of Arabi’s employment settlement, created whereas he was on Qualcomm’s payroll belonged to the corporate. The indictment alleges he and others took elaborate steps to cover his involvement. They portrayed the invention because the brainchild of a Canadian graduate pupil, in response to the indictment. It was being commercialized by a Bay Space startup.

The graduate pupil occurred to be Arabi’s youthful sister. She was learning topics typically associated to , not semiconductor design, in response to the indictment. She legally modified her title through the course of, and whereas she’s listed because the inventor on provisional patents, the purposes had been filed by Arabi utilizing sham e-mail accounts to hide his id, in response to prosecutors.

The indictment additionally alleges Arabi, 56, was closely concerned in founding the startup—calling and attending conferences, selecting its title and hand-picking its chief government officer. He allegedly took steps to cover his involvement, together with establishing bogus e-mail accounts.

The knowledge was hid from Qualcomm throughout negotiations main as much as its acquisition of the eight-month-old startup in October 2015. Arabi left Qualcomm in June 2016 after working there on and off for 9 years.

Arabi and Ali Akbar Shokouhi had been arrested on Monday in San Diego. Shokouhi is an entrepreneur and marketing consultant who was concerned in making the startup seem legit, prosecutors mentioned. He was additionally a former Qualcomm worker.

Sanjiv Taneja, who served because the startup’s CEO and the purpose man for negotiations, was arrested in Northern California. Arabi’s sister, Sheida Alan, was arrested in Canada and faces extradition proceedings to america.

Efforts to succeed in Arabi and Shokouhi, together with contacting their legal professionals, had been unsuccessful. Shokouhi pleaded not responsible throughout an arraignment in San Diego federal courtroom Tuesday and was launched on a $1 million bond. Arabi was not out there to seem in courtroom for unknown causes and was set to be arraigned Wednesday.

If convicted, the 4 charged every face a most penalty of 20 years in jail; fines of $250,000 or twice their achieve for the .

The indictment additionally alleges that the 4 laundered funds by way of schemes that embody overseas actual property purchases and interest-free loans. That would lead to $500,000 fines and the forfeiture of property.

“Fraudsters can’t disguise behind refined know-how or advanced schemes,” mentioned U.S. Lawyer Randy Grossman in a press release. “This workplace will pursue criminals and their laundered, ill-gotten beneficial properties whether or not they’re hidden in a mattress or scattered all through the worldwide monetary system.”

Qualcomm was not recognized particularly within the indictment. It was known as a multi-national San Diego know-how firm. However in 2017, Qualcomm sued Arabi, Taneja and Alan in San Diego Superior Courtroom basically making the identical allegations. The was dismissed with out prejudice in late 2018.

“Defending mental property is a cornerstone of innovation. We thank the U.S. Division of Justice for its work on this case,” the corporate mentioned in a press release.


Software company founder McAfee charged with tax evasion


2022 The San Diego Union-Tribune.
Distributed by Tribune Content material Company, LLC.

Quotation:
Ex-Qualcomm analysis vp and three others charged in $150 million fraud scheme (2022, August 12)
retrieved 12 August 2022
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